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Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan
Three Daughters of Taiwan

Three Daughters of Taiwan

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The "Three Daughters" of Taiwan are the varietals native to the island, born and raised here. This is a beautiful set of all three teas in 75g packets. All 3 teas are MOA Organic Certified!

Kingfisher Jade, or Tsui Yu oolong, is also a hybrid cultivar and came to life in the 1970s, after decades of research. In the Taiwanese index it is TW #13, though farmers often refer to it as “2029” or just “29.” Like Jin Xuan, the leaves of Tsui Yu have veins at 80- to 90-degree angles, though they are long and arrowhead-shaped. When you stand back from a field of Tsui Yu, the leaves have a bluish-green (kingfisher) tint to them and they are more vibrant, with lusher foliage than all the other varietals. Tsui Yu dislikes cold weather, so it can’t be grown at very high altitudes. It is predominantly grown on Mt. Zhu and in the lowlands around Ming Jian. Tsui Yu has a flavor of seaweed, lima beans and often fruit. It is more famous for an aroma of wildflowers and an aftertaste of fresh fruit. Some say it tastes of lotus or lilac, others say cassia or peach. Much of this depends on the terroir, the season and the skill of the producer. The Qi is Yin, which centers you in the heart.

Though you could perhaps call Si Ji Chun a hybrid, it is a natural, wild varietal that arose in Muzha. Since it is a more natural varietal, it is heartier than the others. This is a testament to one of the principles we always promote in these pages when discussing living tea, which is that the leaves produced by humans will never compare to those made by Nature. These trees yield buds at least four times a year, which is where its name comes from. “Si Ji Chun” might also be translated as “Four Seasons like spring,” referring to the fact that this bush can produce as much in other seasons as in spring. It is also thought to be the youngest of the Three Daughters, coming into commercial production in the 1980s. Si Ji Chun does not have a Taiwan classification number, since it evolved naturally. Si Ji Chun is more closely related to Ching Shin than it is to Jin Xuan or Tsui Yu. The leaves of Si Ji Chun are round in shape, with veins that shoot off at 30- to 60-degree angles. The leaves have a light green hue. The buds of Si Ji Chun are often reddish when they emerge. This is a common mutation caused by anthocyanins that protect the tea leaves from UV light.

Jin Xuan oolong is a hybrid that was established in the 1970s. Its Taiwanese number is TW #12, though farmers often refer to it as “2027” or just “27.” These numbers refer to the process the Taiwan Tea Research and Extension Station used to classify the teas as they were developing and testing them. The leaves of Jin Xuan are more round while the branching veins come off the central vein at an almost right angle (80 to 90 degrees). From a distance, the bushes have a yellowish-green hue, which may also help distinguish this cultivar. Jin Xuan tea is primarily grown on Mt. Zhu in central Taiwan. It doesn’t thrive in the extreme cold of very high-altitude gardens or plantations like Ching Shin (青心), but isn’t as susceptible to cold as Tsui Yu (翠玉). When it is healthy, Jin Xuan has more vibrant foliage than other varietals, producing up to 20% more leaves.

3 x 75 grams