• Global Tea Hut

    Tea & Tao Magazine

  • And learn about tea processing

  • And read about the history of tea

  • And learn about tea brewing

  • Global Tea Hut

    Every issue comes with tea!!!

  • Global Tea Hut

    Join a growing global community
    and support our free tea center!

Global Tea Hut

Join a growing global community
and support our free tea center!

Global Tea Hut is an experience. It is an ad-free magazine, with translations of ancient tea texts and modern tea experts, travelogues, articles on tea processing, history and lore as well as the Way of Tea (Cha Dao). And it comes with chemical-free, fair trade tea every month. Global Tea Hut is also a community of tea lovers in over forty countries who are looking to connect, share tea and heart space and learn about tea together. And Global Tea Hut supports a free tea Center, called Tea Sage Hut, which you are welcome to visit, as well as worldwide courses that teach tea brewing and cultivation, all without any financial motivation. Global Tea Hut is a unique opportunity to change the world one bowl at a time…

Global Tea Hut is an experience. It is an ad-free magazine, with translations of ancient tea texts and modern tea experts, travelogues, articles on tea processing, history and lore as well as the Way of Tea. And it comes with chemical-free, fair trade tea every month. Global Tea Hut is also a community of global tea lovers in almost forty countries who are looking to connect, share tea and heart space and learn about tea together. And Global Tea Hut supports free tea centers you yourself can visit, schools that teach tea brewing and cultivation without any financial motivation. Global Tea Hut is a unique opportunity to change the world one bowl at a time…

How Global Tea Hut Works


Stacks Image 68117
Every month, we’ll introduce you to new teas grown without agro-chemicals and farmers working hard at sustainability.

Farmers contribute tea…

Stacks Image 68128
We’ll send you a magazine, gift and rare tea from our center to anywhere in the world. We now share envelopes with more than thirty countries!

You receive an envelope with love every month…

Stacks Image 68139
Learn about tea processing, history, lore and spiritual cultivation together with hundreds of others around the world. Through tea make friends!

Drink tea with people around the world…

Stacks Image 68150
We host hundreds of guests from around the world every year. Room and board, tea and teachings are all free because of your loving support!

Your subscriptions support our free tea center!

Stacks Image 263392

Farmers contribute tea…

Stacks Image 263394

You receive an envelope with love every month…

Stacks Image 263396

Drink tea with people around the world…

Stacks Image 263398

Your subscriptions support our free tea center!


  • Stacks Image 192197
  • Stacks Image 192195
  • Stacks Image 192199
  • Stacks Image 192207
  • Stacks Image 192209
  • Stacks Image 263411
  • Stacks Image 192211
Heavenly Blossom took around six months to create. First, the trees had to be left un-pruned so that they would flower in the autumn of 2016 and Mr. Xie could collect and sun-dry the tea blossoms. Then, after trying some samples, Wu De and Mr. Xie decided to use the more delicate, later winter flush of leaves from tsui yu (kingfisher jade) trees to make the blend we call “Heavenly Blossom.”

Carefully picking the autumn blossoms by hand is quite difficult, as they fall apart easily and have to be caught right when they open. They are then dried in the sun. Since Wu De and Mr. Xie knew there would not be many of them, they suspected that spring green tea would overpower the very subtle and soft flavors of the blossoms. Sure enough, all the spring flushes of each varietal rendered the flowers tasteless and odorless. Mingjian is low-altitude and therefore receives much more sun, resulting in earlier, hardier spring harvests, as well as more flushes overall throughout the year (up to six). This means the tea develops an astringency and bitterness relatively quickly, and even the first flush of tea will be rather harsh if processed into green tea, lacking the delicacy that Wu De imagined for blending with autumn tea flowers.

The tea was picked, withered, pan-fired, rolled into balls because of its delicacy (even though Wu would rather have had striped tea, it can only be made from spring flushes), and then oven-dried. As we discussed earlier, this type of green tea is an example of one that is much better with some leaves mixed in with the buds, lending the tea more depth, fragrance and breadth. There are other all-bud green teas from other regions that would also have gone well with these tea flowers, and Wu De looked into that possibility as well, but it was difficult to find an organic and/or affordable example. In the end, he wanted to keep the whole tea process with our beloved Mr. Xie, so opted for this bud-and-leaf ball-shaped green tea.

Heavenly Blossom is a soft, crisp and fragrant winter green tea with a very slight astringency when brewed properly. The energy of the flowers is profound. If you are sensitive, you will notice the uplifting force they bring to what would otherwise be a very simple green tea. If you can remember the May 2016 Tea of the Month, which was a simple, spring green tea from Mingjian, you will be able to contrast it with the presence of these flowers in the tea. The Qi is much more airy, rising under the arms and carrying you like a soft breeze away from your session.




Subscribe now    and start drinking Heavenly Blossom with all of us!

  • Stacks Image 154631
  • Stacks Image 154633
  • Stacks Image 154635
  • Stacks Image 154637
  • Stacks Image 186689
  • Stacks Image 186683
  • Stacks Image 263414
Stacks Image 263472

Heavenly Blossom took around six months to create. First, the trees had to be left un-pruned so that they would flower in the autumn of 2016 and Mr. Xie could collect and sun-dry the tea blossoms. Then, after trying some samples, Wu De and Mr. Xie decided to use the more delicate, later winter flush of leaves from tsui yu (kingfisher jade) trees to make the blend we call “Heavenly Blossom.”

Carefully picking the autumn blossoms by hand is quite difficult, as they fall apart easily and have to be caught right when they open. They are then dried in the sun. Since Wu De and Mr. Xie knew there would not be many of them, they suspected that spring green tea would overpower the very subtle and soft flavors of the blossoms. Sure enough, all the spring flushes of each varietal rendered the flowers tasteless and odorless. Mingjian is low-altitude and therefore receives much more sun, resulting in earlier, hardier spring harvests, as well as more flushes overall throughout the year (up to six). This means the tea develops an astringency and bitterness relatively quickly, and even the first flush of tea will be rather harsh if processed into green tea, lacking the delicacy that Wu De imagined for blending with autumn tea flowers.

The tea was picked, withered, pan-fired, rolled into balls because of its delicacy (even though Wu would rather have had striped tea, it can only be made from spring flushes), and then oven-dried. As we discussed earlier, this type of green tea is an example of one that is much better with some leaves mixed in with the buds, lending the tea more depth, fragrance and breadth. There are other all-bud green teas from other regions that would also have gone well with these tea flowers, and Wu De looked into that possibility as well, but it was difficult to find an organic and/or affordable example. In the end, he wanted to keep the whole tea process with our beloved Mr. Xie, so opted for this bud-and-leaf ball-shaped green tea.

Heavenly Blossom is a soft, crisp and fragrant winter green tea with a very slight astringency when brewed properly. The energy of the flowers is profound. If you are sensitive, you will notice the uplifting force they bring to what would otherwise be a very simple green tea. If you can remember the May 2016 Tea of the Month, which was a simple, spring green tea from Mingjian, you will be able to contrast it with the presence of these flowers in the tea. The Qi is much more airy, rising under the arms and carrying you like a soft breeze away from your session.

Subscribe now
and start drinking
Heavenly Blossom with all of us!

Raise a bowl in celebration, for this is our third Classics of Tea issue! This time we are exploring the Ming Dynasty, with translations of four Chajin from the time, as well as some insightful commentary from renowned scholars. And we have a gorgeous and unique tea to sip along the way!


Subscribe now    and start reading with all of us!

Raise a bowl in celebration, for this is our third Classics of Tea issue! This time we are exploring the Ming Dynasty, with translations of four Chajin from the time, as well as some insightful commentary from renowned scholars. And we have a gorgeous and unique tea to sip along the way!

Subscribe now

and start reading with all of us!